System Status Limits

06/15/2016
IMPORTANT NOTE – Please know that each hosting service is different, and the methods mentioned below may or may not work for you. Before trying these methods to increase your system status limits, it’s always best to contact your respective hosts first and ask them if they can make these adjustments for you.

Under the Avada > System Status tab, you’ll find a few values in red that you may need to increase or adjust for your site to function optimally. Below you’ll find some of the most common values that users encounter issues with. Continue reading below to learn more about what these values are, why they need to be adjusted and how you can go about adjusting them.

WP Memory Limit

What Is The WP Memory Limit?

The WP Memory Limit is the maximum amount of memory (RAM) that your site can use at one time. When you reach your Memory Limit, you’ll encounter a fatal error. Several things consume memory, such as WordPress itself, the theme you’re using, and the plugins installed on your site. Basically, the more content and features you add to your site, the bigger your memory limit has to be.

Why Do I Need To Increase My WP Memory Limit?

There are a number of factors that may affect how much memory your website will need such as content, themes, plugins, etc. The default memory limit for WordPress is 32MB. If you’re only running a small site with basic functions, this default value is more than enough. However, once you start encountering ‘Fatal Error: Memory Size Exhausted…, it may be time to adjust your memory limit.

How To Increase The WP Memory Limit

To increase your memory limit, you’ll need to access and modify certain files such as the php.ini, wp-config.php, and .htaccess files. Most hosts won’t grant you full access to modify the PHP.ini file because it affects the whole server and all the websites hosted on it. Please contact your host first to find out if they can adjust it for you.

For advanced users who have their own server setups and full access to the php.ini file, please go ahead and try Method 1 first before the other methods. For standard users, we encourage you to try Method 2 and Method 3 instead.

Method 1: Change Your PHP Memory Limit in php.ini File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Many shared hosts prohibit you from having direct access to the PHP.ini file. Only do this method if you have direct access to your PHP.ini file or if you’re on your local host or own server setup. Please note that this won’t change the red WP Memory Limit value reflected in your System Status tab since this method adjusts your PHP memory limit.

Step 1 – Locate your PHP.ini file. If you can’t find it, then you can create your own PHP.ini file in the root folder of your WordPress installation.

Step 2 – If you find your existing PHP.ini, open the file and locate the following line of code (xx represents a number): memory_limit = xxM;. Then change xxM to your desired limit. For example, 256M.

Step 3 – If you created your own PHP.ini file, then add the same code inside it: memory_limit = 256M;. Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 256M.

Step 4 – Save your changes, and reboot your local host or server.


Method 2: Change Your WordPress Memory Limit in WP-config.php File

IMPORTANT NOTE – This is the value that you see displayed on the WP Memory Limit status on the System Status page. Changing this value to the recommended value (256M) will turn the WP Memory Limit status to green on your System Status page.

Step 1 – Locate your wp-config.php file in the root folder of your WordPress installation.

Step 2 – Open the wp-config.php with a text editor program (Notepad or TextEdit) and add the following line of code after ‘define(‘WP_DEBUG’, false);: define ('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');. Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 256M.

Step 3 – Save the file and refresh your System Status tab. If the WP Memory Limit turns green, then you have successfully increased your WP Memory Limit.


Method 3: Change Your PHP Memory Limit in .htaccess File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Make sure to back up your .htaccess file before editing. This is another method to change your PHP memory limit. This will not affect the value displayed in WP Memory Limit on the System Status page.

Step 1 – Locate your .htaccess file which is usually in the root folder of your WordPress installation. If you can’t find it, it may be because it’s hidden. Here’s a tutorial for Windows and a tutorial for Mac on how to reveal hidden files.

Step 2 – Open the .htaccess file with a text editor program (Notepad or TextEdit) and add the following line of code: php_value memory_limit 256M;. Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 256M.

Step 3 – Save the file and refresh your website.


PHP Time Limit

What Is The PHP Time Limit?

the PHP Time Limit is the amount of time (in seconds) that your site will spend on a single operation before timing out. This is also to avoid server lockups. The default value for the PHP Time Limit is 40 seconds. When an operation reaches the time limit set, then it will return a fatal error that looks like this Fatal error: Maximum execution time of xx seconds exceeded....

Why Do I Need To Increase My PHP Time Limit?

Because the default value is only 40 seconds, you will most likely receive a fatal error when running complicated operations. For example, installing our Classic Demo requires a PHP Time Limit value of 300 seconds due to the amount of content it has. We recommend changing your PHP Time Limit to at least 180 seconds, or to 300 seconds if you’d like to import the Classic Demo.

How To Increase The PHP Time Limit

To increase your PHP time limit, you’ll need to access and modify certain files such as the php.ini, wp-config.php, and .htaccess files. Most hosts won’t grant you full access to modify the PHP.ini file because it affects the whole server and all the websites hosted on it. Please contact your host first to find out if they can adjust it for you.

For advanced users who have their own server setups and full access to the php.ini file, please go ahead and try Method 1 first before the other methods. For standard users, we encourage you to try Method 2 or Method 3 instead.

Method 1: Change Your PHP Time Limit in PHP.ini File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Many shared hosts prohibit you from having direct access to the PHP.ini file. Only do this method if you have direct access to your PHP.ini file or if you’re on your local host.

Step 1 – Locate your PHP.ini file. If you can’t find it, then you can create your own PHP.ini file in the root folder of your WordPress installation.

Step 2 – If you find your existing PHP.ini, open the file and locate the following line of code (xx represents a number): max_execution_time = xx; Then change xx to your desired limit. For example, 300.

Step 3 – If you created your own PHP.ini file, then add the same code inside it: max_execution_time = 300; Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 300.

Step 4 – Save your changes, and reboot your local host or your server.


Method 2: Change Your PHP Time Limit in WP-config.php File

Step 1 – Locate your wp-config.php file in the root folder of your WordPress installation.

Step 2 – Open the wp-config.php with a text editor program (Notepad or TextEdit) and add the following line of code after ‘define(‘WP_DEBUG’, false);: set_time_limit(300);. Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 300.

Step 3 – Save the file and refresh your System Status tab. If the PHP Time Limit turns green, then you have successfully increased your PHP Time Limit.


Method 3: Change Your PHP Time Limit in .htaccess File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Make sure to back up your .htaccess file before editing.

Step 1 – Locate your .htaccess file which is usually in the root folder of your WordPress installation. If you can’t find it, it may be because it’s hidden. Here’s a tutorial for Windows and a tutorial for Mac on how to reveal hidden files on your computer.

Step 2 – Open the .htaccess file with a text editor program (Notepad or TextEdit) and add the following line of code: php_value max_execution_time 300. Then just put in the recommended value. For example, 300.

Step 3 – Save the file and refresh your website.


PHP Max Input Vars

What Is The PHP Max Input Vars?

The PHP Max Input Vars is the maximum number of variables your server can use for a single function to avoid overloads. The default value of the PHP Max Input Vars is 1000, while the recommended value is 1540. This limitation will truncate some post data such as your menu items which causes issues like your menu items aren’t saving or being left off.

Why Do I Need To Increase My PHP Max Input Vars?

You may need to increase your PHP Max Input Vars if you’re running into issues with your menu. If your menu items aren’t saving properly, or if the last few menu items are being left off, this is most likely because your PHP Max Input Vars value is too low. We recommend your PHP Max Input Vars to be 1540 in order to load all the Classic Demo’s menu items.

How To Increase The PHP Max Input Vars

Like the other values above, you’ll need to access and modify either the php.ini or the .htaccess files. Most hosts won’t grant you full access to modify the PHP.ini file because it affects the whole server and all the websites hosted on it. Please contact your host first to find out if they can adjust it for you.

For advanced users who have their own server setups and full access to the php.ini file, please go ahead and try Method 1 first before the other method. For standard users, we encourage you to try Method 2 instead.

Method 1: Change Max Input Vars in PHP.ini File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Many shared hosts prohibit you from having direct access to the PHP.ini file. Only do this method if you have direct access to your PHP.ini file or if you’re on your local host.

Step 1 – Locate your PHP.ini file. If you can’t find it, then you can create your own PHP.ini file in the root folder of your WordPress installation.

Step 2 – If you find your existing PHP.ini, open the file and locate the following line of code (xx represents a number): max_input_vars = xx; And set it to your desired limit. For example, 1540.

Step 3 – If you created your own PHP.ini file, then add the same code inside it: max_input_vars = 1540; Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 1540.

Step 4 – Save your changes, and reboot your local host or your server.


Method 2: Change Max Input Vars in .htaccess File

IMPORTANT NOTE – Make sure to back up your .htaccess file before editing.

Step 1 – Locate your .htaccess file which is usually in the root folder of your WordPress installation. If you can’t find it, it may be because it’s hidden. Here’s a tutorial for Windows and a tutorial for Mac on how to reveal hidden files on your computer.

Step 2 – Open the .htaccess file with a text editor program (Notepad or TextEdit) and add the following line of code: php_value max_input_vars 1540. Simply change the value to the recommended value. For example, 1540.

Step 3 – Save the file and refresh your website.


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